Build the Mentorship Program That’s Right For You

At a basic level, four components combine to define any mentorship program. It’s important to build a program that fits your organization.

PARTICIPANTS

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 STYLE

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FORMAT

PURPOSE

PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS

Participants are either mentors or mentees. Roles may be static or shifting. Executives, supervisors, peers, employees and interns are all examples of potential participants.

STYLE

Programs can be informal and unstructured where participants define the scope of the relationship. Program can also be formal, where relationships, context, content, time frame and goals are defined by program facilitators.

FORMAT

Your program format should take into consideration the number of potential mentors, mentees and program goals.

1:1 -Deep relationships between participants

1: MANY – Great when mentees outweigh mentors

MANY : MANY – Expose participants to a variety of views

PURPOSE

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT– Participants develop deep relationships as they work across a wide range of development areas.

REVERSE – To broaden perspectives across generations younger or less experienced mentors partner with older more experienced mentees.

ASSIMILATION – New employees learn culture norms from tenured mentors to quickly integrate into a new organization.

SITUATIONAL OR SKILL – Programs focus on specific goals.

LEADERSHIP – Used to prepare high potentials for leadership and executive roles.

CAREER– Employees and interns partner with mentors to establish career goals and action plans. These programs have the added benefit of developing a strong employer brand.

SPEED – Rapid-fire meetings deliver a large number of viewpoints about targeted information to mentees and mentors.

CIRCLE – Participants assume both mentor and mentee roles.